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Tea Roses: Old Roses for Warm Gardens

Articles: Tea Roses: Old Roses for Warm Gardens

The importance of this new book cannot be emphasized enough, as it fills a gap in rose history and cultivation that has existed since the tea rose was first introduced into Europe from China in the nineteenth century. Only one previous book, in German by Rudolf Geschwind, has been devoted to this classic group of roses.

Perhaps the lack of literature on the tea rose is because these are roses for warm climates; they simply do not thrive in areas of the US with hard frosts or harsh winters. Most of California and some protected places farther north along the West Coast, however, offer ideal homes for them.

These are not the modern, popular hybrid tea roses, but rather re-blooming, colorful, scented shrubs (and a few fascinating climbing roses). Many people cannot smell the “tea” fragrance; for the rest of us, the aroma is delightful and reason enough for using tea roses in our gardens. Delicate beauty is one of the outstanding features of these flowers. Their wide range of colors, providing inspiration for many famous painters over the years, also distinguishes them.

Most of the tea roses in my garden do not go completely dormant in winter as other roses do. Seldom plagued ...

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