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The Freeze of 2007: Responses in a San Diego County Garden

Articles: The Freeze of 2007: Responses in a San Diego County Garden

In the July 2008 issue of Pacific Horticulture, garden writer and horticultural consultant Nan Sterman wrote about 2007’s extreme weather in Southern California, noting the significant consequences visible in her garden in Northern San Diego County. Only three miles from the Pacific Ocean, her garden sits at the bottom of a coastal valley that typically sees light frosts each winter.

In January 2007, however, a massive cold front descended upon the region, dropping temperatures in her garden to an estimated 15° to 19° F, depending upon the location within her sloping garden; nighttime temperatures were only a few degrees warmer over then next several days. Although plants, at first, seemed to have survived the cold snap, damage began to show up after about two weeks. Some plants responded with new growth almost immediately, but most waited until spring or summer to show genuine signs of recovery; some took nearly a year to recover.

Here is Nan’s summary of some of the major plants in her garden and their responses to the freeze.

Plants that Died
Aeonium cvs.
variegated and dark-leafed aeonium selections
•plants appeared to have melted!

Agave guiengola
•plants in a ...

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