We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Seedy Business

Articles: Seedy Business

A collecting trip brings with it an awareness of earth and a sense of well being which adds to the larger life. You exchange confusion for peace; the feverish occupations of the city for the calm and quiet business of stalking plants in Nature’s planless plantings…
Lester Rowntree, Hardy Californians

Despite what you might have heard, the world’s oldest profession is probably seed collecting. Not long after our ancestors emerged on the African savannas, they put their ingenuity to work making baskets to collect and store edible seeds. Today’s seed collector sets out with paper bags from the supermarket, forest service permits, the indulgence of friendly landowners, and, of course, a motor vehicle. Though the collector’s equipage has evolved considerably, the intervening millennia have not changed the essence of seed collecting — keen attention to the life cycles of plants.

Motivations have changed more than methods. The seeds I collect are not destined for the grinding stone, but for the cool recesses of the seed room of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants. Some remain there as part of a reference seed collection that serves archaeologists as wel...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.