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River Work

Articles: River Work

An unnaturally broad, gravel riverbed defined Anderson Creek along the author’s property, prior to his river work. Author’s photographs
Rivers and sunlight, mountains and fish: they are always there, rising up out of exhaustion, a sudden rush of sound and motion, a Wagnerian assault of light and shadow, hissing water, pounding rapids, chilly mountain winds easing inexorably into a requiem of distant rapids, a fish’s silent rise, the splash of blue green water over the back of wet black stones.
Harry Middleton, Rivers of Memory

Mid-February winter storm. It has been raining for days and the soil is supersaturated. The river will be up to its mischief, running bank to bank, dark brown with sediment, violently carrying away all impediments to its will. The memory of last year’s configuration will be all but gone. Every year, we are apprehensive to learn the scale of the damage left in the wake of flood stage. Recently, however, even the dangerously high flows of el niño years have left, literally, truckloads of silt. New depositions of soil are laid down with each ensuing storm, since we placed in-stream stru...

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