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Resurrecting Lawson Cypress for the 21st Century

Articles: Resurrecting Lawson Cypress for the 21st Century

A young plant of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Minima Glauca’ grafted unto a rootstock of moss sawara cypress (C. pisifera f. squarrosa); the enlarged base of the topgrowth could eventually create problems for the grafted plant. Author’s photographs
Anyone raised in the maritime Pacific Northwest, from Portland to Vancouver or Victoria, is familiar with Lawson cypress in residential gardens and public parks, as it is here that the greatest concentration of cultivated trees is found. Accounting for its popularity as a garden plant are its gracious habit, the range of blue, yellow, green and gray green tones in its leaves, the densely held cascading foliage typical of many forms, its tolerance of some degree of shade, and its suitability for this region’s dry summers. There are more than two hundred cultivars in cultivation worldwide.
Not long ago, here in Pacific Horticulture (October '02), Douglas Justice lamented the demise of Lawson cypress or Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana), one of the more important conifers in ornamental horticulture here in the Pacific Northwest. Its nemesis has been a water-bo...

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