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HORTUS Revisited: A Twenty-first Birthday Anthology

Articles: HORTUS Revisited: A Twenty-first Birthday Anthology

On the Pacific Coast, we are afforded magnificent and opposing views of the world. To the west, we see the East, and to the east, the West. Our lives, including our gardens, are influenced greatly by this perspective. One of the greatest influences is English gardens. Not only the gardens, but the thoughts, words, and philosophies of their creators. In his celebratory HORTUS Revisited, editor David Wheeler gives us a sampling of some of the best garden writing coming out of that country—and, perhaps, the world.

HORTUS, an English independent quarterly, was born on Wheeler’s kitchen table in 1987, an answer to his search for a “natural home for the well-turned garden essay.” The writing, aided only by minimal black and white drawings and photographs, is allowed to shine.

Wheeler’s birthday celebration is a coming-of-age anthology giving us the best of the last twenty-one years. In its essays, we are taken to the heights of Annapurna in Nepal with Tony Schilling, or to meet the New Mexican cowboy gardener, Billy Sol Estes, with Susan Elderkin. We are given tours of Lady Ottoline Morrell’s famous garden with Deborah Kellaway, and Beatrix Potter’s fictional ones with Peter Parker...

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