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Green Flowers

Articles: Green Flowers

It has long been my dream to create a garden room featuring blossoms overly endowed with chlorophyll. You can imagine my heart racing when I saw Green Flowers. The exquisite photographs by Marie O’Hara did not disappoint.

The book is encyclopedic in format, based around a Gallery of Green-flowered Plants. A philosophy for designing with green flowers is dealt only a glancing blow in the introduction—easily skipped so that one dives immediately into the plant directory.

There are new plant friends to be made in this book, starting with Acanthus hirsutus, which I knew of but had not seen pictured before. It is the first green flower listed. Where has Albuca shawii—a diminutive summer-flowering bulb—been all my life? The last plant is surprisingly, and sadly, not Zinnia ‘Green Envy’, but rather an old friend, Zigadenus elegans, the native death camas as it is called locally. Another favorite holds no less a place of honor than the title page photo: Hermodactylus tuberosus, the little iris cousin that loves full sun and is drought tolerant. I now wonder why we are all chasing after Eucomis ‘Oakhurst’, with purple foliage and flowers, when Eucomis autumnalis, its cool, creamy gree...

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Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

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Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

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