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Great Plant Picks 2006 Collection of Rambler Roses

Articles: Great Plant Picks 2006 Collection of Rambler Roses

Rosa ‘Francis E Lester’, a climbing hybrid musk rose. Photographs by Richie Steffen, courtesy Great Plant Picks

In the first installment of the Great Plant Picks for 2006, appearing in the last issue of Pacific Horticulture, Carolyn Jones introduced a selection of trees, shrubs, vines, and perennials that offer opportunities for container cultivation. In this issue, Christine Allen presents a group of dependable rambler roses deserving of greater use in Pacific Northwest gardens.

Although roses have long been the world’s favorite flower, many have reservations about their value in the garden. In the last century, a focus on ever larger and brighter flowers has endeared them to the florist’s trade, while neglect of other attributes, such as disease resistance and shapeliness, has alienated designers and home gardeners alike. By highlighting a small collection of healthy, low-maintenance ramblers among the Great Plant Picks for 2006, the GPP team hopes to draw attention to the valuable role these bountiful beauties can play in gardens of the twenty-first century.

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