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Fragrance in the Wild Western Garden: Uncommon Conifers

Articles: Fragrance in the Wild Western Garden: Uncommon Conifers

The ultimate in Wild Western landscapes: snow-covered Mt Shasta towers over lower hills where the pervasive fragrance of juniper mixes with sagebrush and several species of pines. Author’s photographs

Information—of any kind—on fragrant wild plants for Wild Western gardens is often almost impossible to obtain. Good information is especially scarce. This is a shame, for Native peoples once knew a lot, as did a great many settlers. Their knowledge, unfortunately, was seldom passed on. Today, many inhabitants of the Far West cannot even remember people who lived in the Wild West for whom knowledge of wilderness scents was a part of daily life. Indeed, despite the notion that this is an information age, knowledge of smells is often in people’s heads only. On the surface, today, many seem not to care just where an odor originates. They are, perhaps, pleased enough to smell it.

Gardens exist for many purposes ranging from practical and pleasing to bewildering, amazing, and instructive. A stroll through a fragrance garden can fascinate both adults and children. Some instances are straightforward: a fragrant flow...

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Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

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