We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Clematis by the Seaside

Articles: Clematis by the Seaside

Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ covers the lattice near the front door. Photographs by Doug Ploen
When Mary left us here below
The Virgin’s Bower began to blow
Old English couplet

Clematis and roses are the mainstay of my .garden, and they seem to have an affinity for each other, climbing happily together up the same tree or trellis. The gentle twining habit of the large flowered clematis does no harm to the host and is easy to disentangle at the end of the season. Some gardeners plant a clematis whenever they plant a tree, thus ensuring shade for the roots and a climbing frame for the vine.

I’ve enjoyed the genus Clematis since my childhood years in Britain, where I came to know that country’s only native species, C. vitalba, which we knew as old man’s beard from the masses of white, hairy seedheads covering the vines. The common name of Virgin’s bower was thought to be given to this species in honor of the Virgin Mary, since it flowers at the time of the Feast of the Assumption in August. It was used by Edward Bach, an English homeopathic physician in the 1920s who was known for his Bach Flower Remedies. He tri...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.