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Observations in a Small Garden: Rosa ‘Just Joey’

Articles: Observations in a Small Garden: Rosa ‘Just Joey’

As a child, I avoided planting hybrid roses in my garden and could not appreciate my neighbors’ roses given the effort needed to keep them healthy and attractive. Admittedly, Michigan’s humid summers encouraged the spread of all sorts of diseases and not a few pests.

After nearly three decades in California, however, I’ve developed a love for roses of all types. Here, they can be disease free, without all the preemptive chemical sprays necessary elsewhere, if care is given to select those that are best adapted to the location in which they will be grown.

I only have three roses at the moment, two of which came with the garden: ‘Mermaid’ and ‘Golden Showers’ survive and flower well with no attention, high on the slope of my east-facing garden. I tire of the thorniness of ‘Mermaid’, but cherish her pale lemon flowers. Though I’m less enthusiastic about the color of ‘Golden Showers’, its persistence is much appreciated; it flowers nearly year-round, and provides the uphill neighbor with plenty of cut flowers and colorful hips.

Some years ago, I fell in love with the hybrid tea ‘Just Joey’, both for his floral color (apricot) and for his fragrance—a luscious fruity aroma that ...

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Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

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