We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Botany

Articles: Botany

Fuchsia magellanica ‘Aurea’ (syn. ‘Genii’). Photograph by RGT
The truth is a rabbit in a bramble patch. All you can do is circle around and say it’s somewhere in there.
Charles Seeger

The truth is, as a sophomore in college, I received a “D” on my botany exam. Actually, things had gone rather well until the end of the term. I even had a student job assisting my botany professor in his research on goldenrod (Solidago canadensis). I counted the nodes on dried goldenrod specimens—thousands and thousands of nodes on thousands and thousands of specimens. It wasn’t a glamorous job, but it did pay an attractive $1.60 an hour. So I did it.

But then I fell in love, and my devotion to botany waned, especially my willingness to spend hours counting goldenrod nodes. In fact, after my inglorious performance on the exam, I decided my calling was English and avoided further possibility of embarrassment by choosing scientific ignorance over botany classes and a regular paycheck.

Forty years later (married all those years to the fellow who precipitated the disgraceful “D”), I recognize the folly of my decision to for...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.