We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

An Unknown Tree Research Site in Santa Clara Valley

Articles: An Unknown Tree Research Site in Santa Clara Valley

Arbutus xandrachnoides. Photographs by Barrie Coate

As commuters speed along one of Silicon Valley’s major arterials, most would probably be surprised to know they were passing one of the West’s hidden plant treasures, an early test ground for the Saratoga Horticultural Foundation (SHF). In 1963, “Saratoga Hort,” as everyone called it (the full name was too large a syllabic mouthful), began planting a test site that would eventually contain over 180 kinds of plants new to mid-California. The foundation began its twenty-year trial with the installation of a broad range of interesting new plants on the southern half of the approximately seven-acre property, along with a number of experimental cultivars of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) planted as a screen along the freeway boundary.

George Martin, a Los Gatos landscape architect and member of Saratoga Hort’s board of directors, arranged with one of his clients, the San Jose Water Company, for the foundation to use one of their pumping stations as a horticultural test plot. Today, many of the survivors of this noble experiment are living and thriving o...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Welcome, Greywater, to the Garden

Summer 2022 Oh, summer: delightful warm air, tomatoes swelling on the vine, fragrant blooms on an evening stroll. When it’s warm and rainless, how is

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.