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WWOOFing

Articles: WWOOFing

Bringing in an early winter harvest of greens in a blanket of morning fog at Fork & Hoe Collective in Tasmania, Australia. Photo: Jonathan Cooper.

As I can safely assume we all know, most plants come from seeds; something so simple and tiny, yet under the right conditions, packed with all the genetic information to reveal its grand potential.

What about us? At what point do we move from our germ of potential to become a flourishing productive being? An idea can also be sown, but like a sprout searching for the winter sun or an inexperienced gardener ignoring seasonal planting instructions, without proper nurturing and encouragement it will fail to thrive.

This is about how I felt in my own life during a period I sarcastically refer to as my “quarter-life crisis.” In 2012, I was 25 years old. I had recently graduated with an architecture degree and had landed a corporate job; yet I was completely dissatisfied with my contribution to society. I believe deeply in sustainable design, and I could no longer ignore that architecture and construction are among the top producers of waste, pollution, and gre...

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