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Toadshades of the Santa Cruz Mountains

Articles: Toadshades of the Santa Cruz Mountains

Trillium chloropetalum. A clump with soft pink flowers, accompanied by a typical companion, western sword fern (Polystichum munitum). Author’s photographs
...robust plants native to soil muddy in spring, moist in summer. Their green leaves are darkly marbled; flowers are sessile, with upright, elongate petals that form a kind of three-column cloister on a leafy plaza—not a flowery arrangement, but a striking one.
George Schenk, The Complete Shade Gardener

The group of Trillium species known as toadshades could well be the most American of all plants—the widest ranging of all American endemics, native to more states (twenty-nine of them) than any other plant group confined to the United States. Toadshades are native in Texas, California, Washington, Wisconsin, New York, and Florida, but they never venture across the international boundaries of those states. (On the other hand, pedicillate trilliums, or wake robins, which bear a length of stem between foliage and flower, are part of the native flora of extensive regions of the Northern Hemisphere, specifically in the United States, southern Canada, and the O...

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