We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Thanks to Our Feathered Friends

Articles: Thanks to Our Feathered Friends

Seed and wool hung on the squirrel-proof pole; behind is the valley oak (Quercus lobata). Author’s photographs

[sidebar]. . . be patient. Sometimes it takes quite awhile for a bird to find and start using a feeder regularly. But the rewards are worth the wait!

Loren Nancarrow and Janet Hogan Taylor,
Dead Daisies Make Me Crazy[/sidebar]

On spring mornings, while I wait for my coffee to brew, I stand at the kitchen sink and gaze out our window. Time seems to slip past as I watch the antics of our avian visitors: the goldfinches jockeying for a position on the thistle feeder, each wanting an inch or so of “personal space” between them and their neighbors; the house finches lined up on nearby plants or even attempting to hover as they wait for a spot at the feeder full of sunflower seeds; the hummingbirds performing their aerial acrobatics; and the foolish crowd of morning doves, oblivious to a neighborhood cat as they stuff themselves on the patio. I’ve fed birds in my back garden for years, and the entertainment they provide is a tremendous reward.

A few years ago, however, I started offering foods ...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.