We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Garden Allies: Solitary Bees

Articles: Garden Allies: Solitary Bees

An Halictid bee. Illus: Craig Latker

According to one of my favorite books, Evolution of the Insects, if we eliminated bees, ants, and termites from the planet, all terrestrial life would collapse.  Whenever someone expresses a horror of insects, I pull this astonishing assertion from my bag of tricks. Without bees (and a few other six-legged pollinators), I continue, our diet would become horribly bland; we would be living on potatoes, corn, wheat and a few other crops. No apples, berries, oranges, zucchini, or tomatoes. No mint, thyme, oregano, or parsley. No chocolate (midge-pollinated), tea, or coffee. Many of the beautiful flowering plants that we take for granted would also disappear. Insects and flowering plants co-evolved, leading to an explosion of species, and the creation of a multitude of niches for other animals. Bees played a central role in increasing this biodiversity.

The familiar honey bee is not native to the United States, but originated around the Mediterranean. Yet, flowering plants were being pollinated long before the first European settlers brought hives to North America. As honey ...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.