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Restoring Northwest Prairies

Articles: Restoring Northwest Prairies

Glacier Heritage Preserve (GHP) test plots with plowed fields in the background and a band of invasive Scots broom on the periphery. Photo: Daniel Mount

Prairies in the Pacific Northwest are imperiled. Nearly three-quarters of the population of western Washington live in the Willamette Valley/Puget Trough/Georgia Basin eco-region—and  it's one of the fastest developing areas in the country. But University of Washington Affiliate Professor Peter W. Dunwiddie and Associate Professor Jonathon D. Bakker of the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, offer hope for remnants of these species-rich prairies in the Pacific Northwest.

“Over the last two decades, conservation, management, and research in these landscapes have progressed rapidly. Energetic partnerships and collaborations have sprung up to protect these endangered systems, identify key research and management needs, facilitate the exchange of information, generate new methods for restoring and managing rare species and communities, and sustain their long-term viability and ecological health.”

Here's a look at what’s going on behind the scenes:...

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