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Reflections

Articles: Reflections

The entry court of Little and Lewis. The sphere in the foreground is thirty inches in diameter and faces south. The midday sun strikes the surface of the water inside, creating waves of light on the dark inner surface. Paul’s Himalayan rose clambers over the blue Doric Pergola in the background. Photographs by Little and Lewis
At the gentle urging of garden diva Diane Laird, the authors share their personal thoughts on design and on the collaboration behind their garden and the garden sculpture of Little and Lewis, a Bainbridge Island treasure.
I often reflect on the past in order to plan the future. In the years that I’ve been a part of Little and Lewis, I’ve watched thousands of people wander through our small, intimate garden and get lost among the tall plants and dripping fountains. They stop and stare at bright, color-washed, concrete sculptures and dip their hands in still reflective mirrors of water. They pause. They murmur. They contemplate these gifts to the senses.

Fountain columns highlight one end of the entry pool. Lysimachia alexa...

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