We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Pollinators: An Information and Action Guide for West Coast Gardeners

Articles: Pollinators: An Information and Action Guide for West Coast Gardeners

Multiple bumble bees on flowering coffeeberry (Frangula californica syn. Rhamnus californica). Photo: Megan O'Donald

Insects are the most diverse and effective of all animal pollinators; bees, flies, butterflies, moths, wasps, and beetles pollinate about 90 percent of all flowering plants. Bees pollinate about 75 percent of global food crops and are responsible for most of the plant-derived antioxidants, vitamins, and many other essential nutrients in the human diet.

It’s not news that the domestic honeybee (Apis mellifera) is in trouble. Populations are declining due to pesticides, parasites, and disease as well as a threat specific to domestic honeybees, identified in 2007 as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), wherein hives die because mature bees leave and do not return. The situation with domestic honeybees has drawn attention to the plight of native bees. Once viewed only as back-up pollinators when honeybees were unavailable, under continuing pressure from CCD, native bees are now recognized as vital to human nutrition and to the native plants they evolved with.

[caption id="attachment_8404" align="a...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.