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Planting the New California Garden Part 2: Margie Grace, APLD

Articles: Planting the New California Garden Part 2: Margie Grace, APLD

The courtyard at Victoria Garden Mews is filled with resilient, habitat-friendly plants. Comfortable benches encourage residents to linger. Photo: courtesy of Grace Design Associates, Inc.

This is the second in a 4-part series we’ve named Planting the New California Garden. Throughout 2017 we’ll be highlighting the work of APLD designers to illustrate practical water-use data beautifully brought to life in a finished landscape. Our Planting the New California Garden series is funded in part by a grant from the Saratoga Horticultural Research Foundation.

Margie Grace and her team designed Victoria Garden Mews to be a sustainable oasis—a certified LEED platinum oasis—for three families in Santa Barbara. A water-thrifty garden is the heart of this small, private development, with space for people to dine, relax, and grow food. Most of the landscape consists of drought-tolerant plants that offer habitat for native species, but humans also thrive among the shared fruit trees and vegetable garden nearby. The cordoned and espaliered fruit trees are productive but unobtrusive, and when they need supplemental ...

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