We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

In the Footsteps of Augustine Henry and his Chinese plant collectors

Articles: In the Footsteps of Augustine Henry and his Chinese plant collectors

During my first visit to Dublin several years ago, I visited the iconic garden of plantswoman Helen Dillon in a salubrious quarter of that city. Like the thousands that had visited previously, and since, I was entranced by her intricately ordered borders using the cream of garden worthy plants. Slightly out-of-sync in one of her color schemes were the splendid orange flowers of Lilium henryi that, upon closer inspection, were not planted in her garden at all, but from the adjoining property and former home of Augustine Henry.

That interface with one of Europe's most proficient and scholarly plant collectors of all time only served to make me more aware of his contributions to Western horticulture. A walk through my current garden in Indianola, Washington or my previous garden—Heronswood—in Kingston, Washington would in short order illuminate the staggering numbers of hardy plants Henry collected in western China and Taiwan at the end of the 19th century. Below a now stately 50-foot specimen of Emmenopterys henryi grows both the handsome bramble, Rubus henryi var. bambusarum,  as well as the supremely good woodlander in the birthwort family, Saruma henryi.  Sinowilsonia henryi, a...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.