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Hollywood Revival

Articles: Hollywood Revival

The mature front courtyard offers visitors colorful foliage, contrasting textures, and a congenial inviting pathway framed by blooming freesias, and an espaliered ceanothus flushed with violet blue blooms. Photo: Jeff Dunas.
How would you define a successful residential landscape?
As a professional landscape designer, I’ve heard many responses to this question. Wish lists from clients often include: shade, privacy, areas for food production and preparation, increased property value, spaces to entertain and relax, play spaces for children and dogs, parking, storage, greenery—all design pieces to be puzzled together beautifully.

Residential property is often a heavily used and maxed-out plot of land. A successful design starts with good analysis; add in creativity, building material selection, and a substantial dose of sensibility to envision the future space and make an art of it. What will it look like in one year, five years, or ten years? How will plants appropriate to the site conditions be artfully installed to provide habitat and forage for native and migrating insects and birds? What irrigation and d...

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