We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Filoli’s Daffodil Collection

Articles: Filoli’s Daffodil Collection

A field of daffodils and young fruit trees, with the mansion in the background. Photograph by Saxton Holt.

No other flower says spring like the daffodil. The pleasure of seeing a whole field of bright yellow trumpets, planted en masse, is a heart-warming and exhilarating experience. What better way to celebrate spring and the daffodil season than to visit Filoli in late February and March, to enjoy its flower fields, and learn about its exceptional collection of daffodils—both historic and modern.

Many of Filoli’s daffodils were in existence when Filoli became a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1975. They had been planted in the early 1900s, during the “Great Daffodil Renaissance,” when it was fashionable for estate owners like the DuPonts, the Rockefellers, and the Bourns, here at Filoli, to plant modern types of daffodils from England, in masses on their English-style estates. Whole hillsides and fields were planted with them. Daffodils, as we know them today, were actually a hot new plant then, and wealthy collectors paid large sums for single bulbs of great rarity.

[capti...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.