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Encyclopedia of Northwest Native Plants for Gardens and Landscapes

Articles: Encyclopedia of Northwest Native Plants for Gardens and Landscapes

This massive volume is a must-have for those serious about growing native plants (and strong enough to lift it). While the authors suggest it is not their intent that the book be used as a field guide to the identification of native plants, it is comprehensive enough (though too hefty) to almost serve this purpose.

The included plants are grouped into the basic categories of ferns, conifers, annuals, perennials, shrubs, and trees. For each plant, the format of information offered is essentially the same. First come comments about each new genus if it offers more than one species suitable for cultivation; in addition to the family and common names associated with that genus, these comments address the taxonomy, distribution of species, number of species, and methods of propagation that are effective for the particular group of plants.

For each species, there is considerable information about growth habit, flowers, and fruits. A paragraph headed “Cultivation” describes how best to situate the plant, noting its soil, exposure, and watering preferences.

Then follow paragraphs headed “Propagation” and “Native Habitat.” The first offers specific information on how the particular...

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