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Designing with Blue

Articles: Designing with Blue

My how we love blue flowers.

From "A Gardener Comes to Term with Blue" in the fall issue of Pacific Horticulture:
When I talk of blue, you realize, I mean true primary blue, or those blues diluted with white or fortified with black, not the blues tainted with pink, or lit up with yellow. I list turquoise and periwinkle among my favorite color, but consider neither blue True blue, so rare in nature, finds its most glorious expression in flowers: forget-me-nots, sages, and gentians.
(Daniel’s caveat emptor: though I find all of the following flowers to be true blue. However, due to the instability of blue pigments and under the influence of climate, growing conditions, or the perception of the eye of the beholder hues may veer into a purplish territory. For an example: the many blue-flowered members of the borage family will change colors as the pH of the flower changes over time, often indicating whether it has been pollinated or not.)

Myosotis sylvatica ‘Royal Blue’ Photo: Daniel Mount

Spring:

Bellevalia pycnantha

Ceanothus ‘Dark Star’; C. ‘Mt. Haze’; C. ‘Julia Phelps’

Chionodoxa forbesi...

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Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

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