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Bella Madrona

Articles: Bella Madrona

A bountiful border filled with perennials and shrubs at Bella Madrona. Photo: Lorene Edwards Forkner

[sidebar] Join PHS for an afternoon at Bella Madrona, August 5, 2017, 2 to 5pm. Registration information here.[/sidebar]

Bella Madrona is a pleasure garden. Named for the towering madrones on the five-acre site, the garden is located southwest of Portland in Sherwood, Oregon. Planting began in 1980 and over the years several distinct garden rooms have evolved; some are intimately enclosed by hedges, others inhabit expansive open space. Plant-filled sunny borders give way to verdant green shade. Recycled, rusty bits mark a pathway that wanders along a stream; there’s even a secret forest walk populated with quirky garden gnomes. The romantic landscape was celebrated in “The Gardens of Sampson & Beasley,” Pink Martini’s lyrical ode to a moonlit garden. Now 37 years old, the recently refreshed mature garden possesses a sense of place that is, to many visitors, alluring, eccentric, and magical.

Companionable seating is staged throughout the g...

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