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Beacon Food Forest

Articles: Beacon Food Forest

Beacon Food Forest schematic courtesy of Harrison Design.

Located in Southeast Seattle, Beacon Hill is a culturally diverse neighborhood that’s uniting behind a horticultural experiment. Breaking away from a traditional community garden model with separate beds tended by individuals, gardeners at the Beacon Food Forest are combining their efforts to create the nation’s largest edible forest based on permaculture ideas. It’s an exciting collaboration developed by a 
new generation of environmental leaders and thinkers.

In 2009, Glen Hurley was taking a Permaculture Design Course (PDC). The class followed a standardized format developed by the Permaculture Institute to teach students about the practical applications of permaculture. At the same time, Hurley was volunteering on the planning committee for the new Jefferson Reservoir Park, a new city park topping an old reservoir. Hurley saw an opportunity to transform a grassy slope on the park’s western edge into a food forest using the concepts taught in the PDC. Hurley and a team of like-minded students developed this vision into a proposal and schematic de...

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