We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Tips on Creating a Fire-Resistant Landscape

Articles: Tips on Creating a Fire-Resistant Landscape

[sidebar]Reposted with permission from the November 14, 2017 American Garden School newsletter[/sidebar]

Fire resistant landscapes both use plants that have low flammability, and cite them strategically so as to reduce the amount of fuels (vegetation) that could ignite structures or carry flame across the landscape.  In a 30-foot diameter around structures, plants that require more water are used and are watered regularly. 30-70 feet from a structure, more drought-resistant plants are used, and are watered regularly but appropriately to their needs.  Well-hydrated plants take longer to ignite than plants with low moisture content. Shrubs and trees are widely spaced and don't touch or hang over structures. Low growing plants are used around decks and under windows. Foundation shrubs are eliminated and low growing groundcover-type plants are used instead.  Plants are not contiguous.

Photo: courtesy of American Garden School

In urban areas, houses and other structures constitute the most flammable items rather than plants. However, using plants with low flammability, keeping them well hydrated, and mainta...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.