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Seizing Citrus Season

Articles: Seizing Citrus Season

The 'Sanguinello' blood orange is deeply perfumed with dramatic dark red flesh. Photo: Becky Wheeler
I recently met a new cousin who lives on the opposite side of the world in Australia and is just a few days over one year old. He eats solid food like a champ, but is so smitten with mandarins, specifically, that when he sees a tree pregnant with the round, juicy fruits he holds out both hands and grunts ferociously, leaning his whole body weight forward in his mother’s arms. Unfortunately—or fortunately—depending on who you are in this story, they have a citrus tree in their back yard. So this scenario plays out pretty regularly.
When citrus season rolls around each winter I, too, find myself reduced to grunts and leaning forward with both hands to greedily grab at what I see. Gorgeous fruits lay waiting for me on every aisle of the produce section and in every stall of the San Diego farmers market. I should probably try my hand at growing citrus myself, but I would likely be paralyzed with having to choose just one or two. So I resolve my dilemma by regularly recommending my favorite varieties to friends and ...

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