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Seed Saving for a Delicious Future

Articles: Seed Saving for a Delicious Future

‘Glass Gem’ corn is a wind-pollinated modern heirloom selected by Carl Barnes. Photo: The Living Seed Company

My greatest reward is harvesting seed. I find it miraculous that a single small seed can reproduce, often thousands of times over, all the while adapting to its environment. It is also astounding to me that humans have been involved with this process for at least 12,000 years, consciously selecting seed that originated from wild plants for useful characteristics and traits. This seed was handed down from one generation to the next, shared with the community, or traded to other communities and families, increasing the bounty of both the giver and receiver.

Label ripening seed in the garden. Photo: The Living Seed Company

Humans and plants evolving together in a mutually beneficial alliance is a relationship often overlooked in our modern world. Not so long ago, most gardeners routinely saved seed from their gardens and handed it down to their children or shared with their neighbors and community. These heirloom seeds were tr...

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