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Salvia Summit II

Articles: Salvia Summit II
Photo: John Whittlesey

Salvia muirii basking in the afternoon sun with other dryland companions. Photo: Jennifer Jewell.

The genus Salvia offers just about everything a gardener might want: prismatic colors, heady perfumes, sensual textures, and complex flavors; they can be hardy, tender, diminutive or expansive. With the right selections, Salvia can be focal points in most any garden, almost year round. I lean on them hard in my interior Northern California garden and I am always interested in learning more. Even after my garden’s Salvia collection doubled this last year with help and advice from salvia-expert and friend John Whittlesey, I have a mere 20+ species. This doesn’t scratch the surface of this vast genus, which is the largest in the mint (Lamiaceae) family and boasts around 900 total species and many, many more cultivars.

Thus, I was happy indeed to hear that the world’s foremost authorities on this generous genus are gathering for Salvia Summit II at The Huntington Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California from Thursday, March 7th to Sunday, March 10th, 2013. (Salvia Summit I took place at Cabrillo College in Apto...

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Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

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