We envision a resilient world dependent on the thoughtful cultivation of plants

Plantiful

Articles: Plantiful

I was not without strong misgivings when first seeing the cover of Plantiful, the colorful new title engagingly written and photographed by Kristin Green, published by Timber Press, and emblazoned with the tag-line: “Start small, grow big with 150 plants that spread, self-sow and overwinter.”

When I was a young gardener just transplanting myself from my mother’s garden to my own, I was as eager (and obsessed) as gardeners come. I wanted a dense tapestry-like garden overflowing with FLOWERS—the more color and scent the better. I wanted my garden to be filled with stories. I wanted to be able to say things like “this Queen Anne’s lace was started from seed collected from my great aunt’s garden,” or “this was a pass-along cutting from so-and-so’s garden.”

I was a fan of thuggish plants that could hold their own and reproduce with impunity. Let them all slug it out, I thought as I enjoyed gooseneck loosestrife (Lysimachia clethroides), clary sage (Salvia sclarea), Verbena bonariensis, mint (Mentha species), Mexican feather grass (Nassella tenuissima), and various Euphorbia. The plants filled (and overflowed) first my large Vermont backyard where cold winters kept some things unde...

READ THE WHOLE STORY


Join now to access new headline articles, archives back to 1977, and so much more.

Enjoy this article for FREE:

Articles: Calochortophilia: A Californian’s Love Affair with a Genus by Katherine Renz

If you are already a member, please log in using the form below.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Social Media

Garden Futurist Podcast

Most Popular

Videos

Topics

Related Posts

Pacific Plant People: Carol Bornstein

Spring 2022 Public gardens play a key role in demonstrating naturalistic planting design, selecti… READ THE WHOLE STORY Join now to access new headline articles,

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration

Your free newsletter starts here!

Don’t want to see this pop-up? Members, log-in here.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

Why do we ask for your zip code?

We do our best to make our educational content relevant for where you garden.

The information you provide to Pacific Horticulture is NEVER sold, shared, or rented to others.

Pacific Horticulture generally sends only two newsletters per Month.