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Guerrillas in the Fog

Articles: Guerrillas in the Fog

The Pennsylvania Street Garden in San Francisco. Photographs by RGT

People have gardened on abandoned and neglected land for generations. There is a long history in many countries of “squatters” growing crops on land that belonged to someone else, and many subsistence farmers around the world still cultivate food in this manner. Urban movements, such as the Vacant Lot Cultivation Associations popular in the US during the 1890s and the Victory Gardens during World War II, furthered the idea that people could grow food for themselves and their communities on land that did not belong to them.

Succulents were clustered at the northern edge of the Pennsylvania Street Garden, where they tolerate heat reflected off a neighboring corrugated metal building; woven twig edgings help define the pathways

A more recent variation on this urban theme has been dubbed “guerrilla gardening;” it often involves a political action or public statement regarding land rights, land reform, or environmentalism. By growing crops or ornamental gardens on land th...

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