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Ed Carman, 1922–2002

Articles: Ed Carman, 1922–2002

Ed Carman in his nursery. Photograph by George Waters

Western horticulture lost a great friend with the passing of Edward Stuart Carman. Ed’s chief contributions to the world of gardeners were his endless curiosity about plants, his great skill at propagating them, his wide network of horticultural friends and correspondents, and his unflagging zeal in attending meetings of the California Horticultural Society and the Western Horticultural Society, where he was often the court of last resort in identifying rare and unusual plants. He knew them because he grew them.

It is hard to believe that Ed had spent more than fifty years in the nursery business. To me he seemed ageless—slim, blond, and active—until his eightieth year. Even in his final illness, he continued to work in his nursery, sowing seeds, making cuttings, and harvesting his kiwi fruit and guavas. He was born in Los Gatos and lived there all his life. He worked in his father’s San Jose nursery on Bascom Avenue until called to service in the infantry during World War II. After the war and study at San Jose State, he married Jean Campbell. In 197...

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