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Beneficial Buckwheats

Articles: Beneficial Buckwheats

Keying out the differences between buckwheat species that closely resemble one another can come down to very technical differences - this could be one of several similar species of buckwheat in summer bloom in the Three Sisters Wilderness of central Oregon’s Willamette National Forest. Photo: Jennifer Jewell
This winter, my garden in the north central Sacramento Valley reached a low temperature of 21°F. My big blue oaks were leafless; the frosty nights, grey wet storm patterns, and long nights settled in for the season. In summer, I can count on not having a drop of natural precipitation for four to six monthsand temperatures will top 110°F on a regular basis.
As an avid gardener, I want a lovely, lively garden, but I don’t want to pretend I live in another place with a different climate. So I must be resourceful and expand my knowledge of good garden plants. Judiciously chosen native and climate-appropriate plants can and do make all the difference. For dramatic color and the durability to thrive in my garden, the wild native buckwheats are among my favorites.

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