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A Designer’s Tips for a Rooftop Garden

Articles: A Designer’s Tips for a Rooftop Garden

Beth Mullins of Growsgreen and homeowner Richard Hosek collaborated on the design of this rooftop garden in San Francisco. Photo: Beth Mullins.

My dirty little secret? I love interior design as much as I do landscape design. Growing up, I remember rearranging the classroom in my mind to create spaces that I thought worked better. In my imagination I would “toss” some objects out that didn’t “go” or “paint” a wall, an exercise that allowed me to settle into the spaces I encountered. In grad school I tried to feed this “spatial-organization-beast” by studying biochemistry— a system of scaffolding and highways that keep cells organized and deliver molecules and proteins to their specific destinations. It worked for a while, but I kept feeling the pull tomacroscopic design as opposed to what I was studying in the microscope.

[pullquote] Enjoy your rooftop garden for morning coffee or for a quick site after dinner—even if it's cold[/pullquote]

Define seating areas and planting spaces with painters tape to try on different lay outs early in the ...

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